Europe’s response to HIV: ECDC reports identify key areas for action

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​In a set of reports published today, ECDC gives an overview on how European countries have been responding to the HIV epidemic since 2004 based on the commitments as outlined in the Dublin Declaration on Partnership to Fight HIV/AIDS in Europe and Central Asia.

​In a set of reports published today, ECDC gives an overview on how European countries have been responding to the HIV epidemic since 2004 based on the commitments as outlined in the Dublin Declaration on Partnership to Fight HIV/AIDS in Europe and Central Asia.

The monitoring reports published today are based on data provided by the 55 countries of Europe and Central Asia and summarise their progress in dealing with key issues related to HIV in the region. They also identify priority areas for action to improve the response for those most affected by the HIV epidemic: men who have sex with men, migrants, people who inject drugs, prisoners and sex workers.

“We need good data for effective public health planning and action”, points out ECDC Acting Director Andrea Ammon. “Especially in times when HIV and overall health budgets are under pressure, high-quality data on these aspects of the HIV situation are essential to inform evidence-based decision-making and effective public health planning. For 2013 our data show that not even half of those most at risk of infection were tested and 47% of those that were diagnosed got their diagnosis at a late stage. Such low testing rates and high numbers of late diagnosis seriously undermine the effectiveness of Europe’s HIV response.”

Since 2004, there have been important strides forward. Treatment, for example, is now available for most key populations across the EU/EEA and countries are generally starting HIV treatment earlier, e.g. Austria, France, Italy and Romania reported that they have stopped using CD4 cell-count-based thresholds to initiate treatment and have instead introduced test-and-treat strategies to the benefit of those persons living with HIV. Data from 29 countries show that the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy almost doubled between 2009 and 2013. However, in a significant proportion of countries, one in six people who need treatment still does not receive it, mostly in non-EU/EEA countries.
 
“Looking at these monitoring data, we see that Europe has made great strides in putting more people living with HIV on treatment. Yet we have to do more to detect those who are infected with HIV earlier and in a next step make sure they receive quality care and antiretroviral therapy to reduce AIDS-related illness and death”, stresses Ammon.
 
Since 2010, ECDC has been conducting a monitoring exercise every two years in order to document the implementation of the 2004 Dublin Declaration and with it the response to the HIV epidemic in Europe and Central Asia. Following ECDC’s 2010 and 2012 progress reports, a new series of thematic reports and evidence briefs present the main findings, discuss key issues, and provide an overview of Europe’s HIV response in 2014.
 
 

The Dublin Declaration Monitoring - 2014 progress series includes

See all reports: Dublin Declaration monitoring - 2014 progress

 

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 Monitoring implementation of the Dublin Declaration