Surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in Europe, 2010

Surveillance report

In 2010, a new enhanced surveillance system for invasive pneumococcal disease was established in the European Union, coordinated by ECDC, and this report describes the results of the first year of data collection (2010 data). The main aim is to provide information on the epidemiological trends and morbidity caused by the circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility and certain other epidemiological features of invasive pneumococcal disease.
In 2010, 21 565 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were reported in 26 EU/EEA countries. The highest notification rates are among children under one year (18.54 per 100 000) and adults of 65 years or above (15.59 per 100 000). Meningitis was the most common clinical presentation reported among children under one year while pneumonia/septicaemia was the most frequent presentation for all other age groups.

Executive summary

The first surveillance report on invasive pneumococcal disease with data from across Europe is published by ECDC.

Coordinated by ECDC, a new enhanced surveillance system was established in the EU in 2010. This report describes the results of the first year of data collection (2010) from this new system. The main aim of the surveillance is to chart the epidemiological trends and morbidity caused by circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility and certain other epidemiological features of invasive pneumococcal disease. This report is vital to provide good-quality surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in order to monitor changes in the incidence, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance of isolates following the introduction of vaccines.

Pneumococcal vaccination is offered to different groups of the population across Europe. EU/EEA countries should consider actively offering the vaccination to reduce the burden of the disease. Notably, high rates in the over 65 years and the increase in the number and severity of patients during the winter, support the necessity for revising vaccine recommendations in the elderly.

In 2010, 21 565 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were reported in 26 EU/EEA countries. The highest notification rates were among children under one year old (18.54 per 100 000) and adults of 65 years or above (15.59 per 100 000).