World Refugee Day 2019

Event
20 Jun 2019

World Refugee Day, held each year on 20 June, highlights the challenges of those who had to flee their homes and show solidarity with displaced people throughout the world.

Refugees are a population group, which is particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases. In a number of EU/EEA Member States, refugees are disproportionately affected by infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, HIV, and hepatitis B and C. 

ECDC’s guidance on screening and vaccination

Migrant child drinking water. © Istock

The ECDC guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA provides Member States with evidence-based scientific advice for a number of key infectious diseases. The report suggests that it is likely to be both effective and cost-effective to screen child, adolescent and adult migrants for diseases such as active and latent tuberculosis, HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B. It also suggests that there is a clear benefit to enrolling migrants in vaccination programmes and ensuring catch-up vaccination where needed.

Priority needs to be given to promoting uptake of screening and vaccination in high-risk migrant populations, such as the refugees, and in particular, to improving uptake of TB, HIV and hepatitis testing and ensuring linkage to care and treatment.

News

ECDC issues migrant screening and vaccination guidance

News story -

Publication

Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA

Public health guidance -

Publication

Handbook on implementing syndromic surveillance in migrant reception/detention centres and other refugee settings

Technical guidance -

Publication

Public health guidance on tuberculosis control in vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations

Public health guidance -

Publication

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in migrants, multi-country cluster - 3rd update, 13 April 2017

Risk assessment -

Food- and waterborne diseases

Refugees are also more likely to experience disrupted or uncertain supplies of safe food and water, especially when they stay in overcrowded settlements. In these conditions, food is often stored and prepared under unsanitary conditions which increases the likelihood of outbreaks of diseases such as salmonellosis, shigellosis, campylobacteriosis and norovirus and hepatitis A.

Disease / public health area

Salmonellosis (non-typhi, non-paratyphi)

Disease / public health area

Shigellosis

Disease / public health area

Campylobacteriosis

Disease / public health area

Norovirus infection

Disease / public health area

Hepatitis A

Peer-reviewed publications

Peer-Reviewed Publication

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis among migrants in the EU/EEA: A systematic review

Apr 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in migrants in the EU/EEA: A systematic review

Aug 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening for and vaccination against hepatitis B virus among migrants in the EU/EEA: A systematic review

Sep 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of hepatitis c screening for migrants in the EU/EEA: A systematic review

Sep 2018

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Prevention and assessment of infectious diseases among children and adult migrants arriving to the European Union/European Economic Association: A protocol for a suite of systematic reviews for public health and health systems

Jan 2017